× Introduction~ Institute on Statelessness and Inclusion
International and regional safeguards to protect children from statelessness~ Laura van Waas
A nationality for Denny~ Institute on Statelessness and Inclusion
Safeguards against childhood statelessness under the African human rights system~ Ayalew Getachew Assefa
Mapping safeguards in Europe~ Institute on Statelessness and Inclusion
Foundlings in Côte d’Ivoire~ Laura Parker
Reflecting on the lost children of Côte d’Ivoire~ Institute on Statelessness and Inclusion
International surrogacy arrangements and statelessness~ Sanoj Rajan
Preventing childhood statelessness of children of prisoners~ Laurel Townhead
Do jus soli regimes always protect children from statelessness? Some reflection from the Americas~ Juliana Vengoechea Barrios
Making safeguards work: A perspective from South African legal practice~ Liesl Muller, Lawyers for Human Rights
Stateless and invisible~ Tini Zainudin
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Mapping safeguards in Europe

Institute on Statelessness and Inclusion

This map shows the status of legislative safeguards to ensure that children born stateless in Europe acquire a nationality. It was published by the European Network on Statelessness in its report “No Child Should be Stateless” as part of its region-wide #statelesskids campaign in 2015. “Full” safeguards are those which comply fully with international law; “partial” safeguards retain conditions that are not permitted under international law; and the countries with “no / minimal” safeguards provide no real avenue for stateless children born on the territory to acquire a nationality. Since the map was published, Norway (featured here in orange) has passed a new instruction introducing a safeguard that is compliant with international law. Using visuals to communicate the extent to which a country’s law falls short of international standards – and how this compares to other states in the region – can be a helpful tool in awareness raising and advocacy for law reform.